Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1822/77355

TitleExclusive breastfeeding moderates the association between prenatal and postpartum depression
Author(s)Figueiredo, Bárbara
Pinto, Tiago Miguel
Costa, Raquel
KeywordsFemale
Humans
Mental Health
Postpartum Period
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Breast Feeding
Depression, Postpartum
breastfeeding duration
exclusive breastfeeding
lactation
postpartum depression
prenatal depression
Issue date2021
PublisherSAGE
JournalJournal of Human Lactation
CitationFigueiredo, B., Pinto, T. M., & Costa, R. (2021). Exclusive Breastfeeding Moderates the Association Between Prenatal and Postpartum Depression. Journal of Human Lactation, 37(4), 784–794. https://doi.org/10.1177/0890334421991051
Abstract(s)BackgroundExclusive breastfeeding has a wide range of benefits for maternal health. However, the benefit of exclusive breastfeeding for maternal mental health needs to be further explored.Research AimTo determine the moderating role of exclusive breastfeeding at 3 months on the association between prenatal and postpartum depression.MethodsThis study had a prospective, longitudinal, and comparative design with two groups and three assessment waves. The sample comprised 334 participants (70 depressed and 264 non-depressed) recruited at public health services in northern Portugal. Participants completed a measure of depression symptoms between the second and the third trimester of pregnancy and between 3 and 6 months, and a measure of breastfeeding status at 3 months.ResultsExclusive breastfeeding at 3 months moderated the association between prenatal and postpartum depression. Participants with prenatal depression who were exclusively breastfeeding at 3 months showed fewer symptoms of depression and lower rates of depression between 3 and 6 months postpartum, compared to participants with prenatal depression who were not exclusively breastfeeding. Participants without prenatal depression who were exclusively breastfeeding at 3 months showed similar depression symptoms and similar rates of depression between 3 and 6 months postpartum, compared to participants without prenatal depression who were not exclusively breastfeeding.ConclusionExclusive breastfeeding has a potential protective influence on postpartum depression among women with prenatal depression. Public health policies targeting women with prenatal depression should be implemented and include practices to promote and support exclusive breastfeeding in order to enhance women's exclusive breastfeeding and mental health.
TypeArticle
URIhttps://hdl.handle.net/1822/77355
DOI10.1177/0890334421991051
ISSN0890-3344
Publisher versionhttps://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0890334421991051
Peer-Reviewedyes
AccessRestricted access (UMinho)
Appears in Collections:CIPsi - Artigos (Papers)

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